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PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to congress. Also on our rundown: more evidence that the rent is too, damn, high; Marathon County braces for sulfide mining; and the focus on recycling this weekend for Earth Day in North Dakota.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - AZ: Poverty Issues

Landlords are supporting bills to make it harder for tenants to dispute the loss of a security deposit, and shorten the amount of time abandoned property must be stored. (Wikimedia Commons)

PHOENIX – Two bills to tighten up rules on renters are up for debate in the Arizona Legislature this week - and anti-poverty groups are fighting to defeat them.

Statistics show that the Arizona economy improved markedly after the minimum wage hike last January. (Cohdra/Morguefile)

PHOENIX, Ariz. – Millions of Arizonans are getting a bump in pay starting Monday – when the minimum wage goes up from $10 to $10.50 an hour. Voters passed Proposition 206 in 2016, so the minimum wage jumped from $8.05 to $10 last January. Tomas Robles, co-executive director of the gr

A new report shows low-income Arizonans are 18 percent less likely to be registered to vote compared with high-income voters.(Svablar/morguefile)

PHOENIX – The American Civil Liberties Union Arizona released a report on Tuesday alleging widespread violations of the National Voter Registration Act that could have hindered registration for tens of thousands of low-income Arizonans. Federal law requires the Motor Vehicle Division (MDV) t

Working for peanuts? A new report on poverty says many Arizona workers just aren't making a living on the state's $10.10 minimum wage. (Cohdra/Morguefile)

PHOENIX - More than 1 million people in Arizona live below the poverty line, according to a new report from the Coalition on Human Needs. In 2016, Arizona's poverty rate stood at 16.4 percent - down one percentage point from the year before, but almost 2.5 percentage points above the national rate,

Financial barriers can prevent parents from scheduling a follow-up eye exam after a vision screening detects a problem with their child's eyesight. (Joe Whited/Flickr)

PHOENIX – Eyes are windows for learning, and when children can't see well, their education can suffer. Benita Loy, health services coordinator for the Washington Elementary School District, says the earlier a sight problem is detected, the better. But only about 27 percent of Arizona child

New rules forcing payday lenders to verify a borrower's ability to repay take effect in July 2019. (Kelly Griffith/Center for Economic Integrity)

PHOENIX – Consumer advocates are praising a new rule issued on Thursday by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. It requires payday lenders to start requires payday lenders to start verifying a borrower's ability to repay before rolling it over into a new loan. The rule aims to prevent a

An estimated 14 percent of Arizona students in grades K through 12 were chronically absent in 2014. <br />(Max Klingensmith/Flickr)

PHOENIX – School is back in full swing in Arizona, and there's work underway to ensure children are not missing out on the opportunity to learn. September is Attendance Awareness Month, and educators say it's never too early to build a healthy habit of getting to school on time each and ever

Experts say services to help the elderly stay in their homes would likely be cut if the Affordable Care Act were to be repealed without a replacement. (AARP)

PHOENIX -- Repealing Obamacare without a replacement would be a disaster for Arizona families and the health care system according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The report showed that either a total repeal or a revival of the Republican health care bill would put

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